What is a tire pressure sensor?

A tire pressure sensor monitors the air pressure of your tire.  In the US it became law that any vehicle built after September 2007 with ABS must have sensors.  So many vehicles coming into Canada are also coming equipped with these sensors. 

There are two types of sensors.  One is an indirect sensor which is a band measuring the revolutions of the tire and the other is a direct sensor which is located inside each tire.  The direct sensors have their own challenges as they have batteries in them and batteries don’t last forever.  Also, what if you buy winter tires and rims but you don’t want to buy 4 more sensors and opt to have the light on your dash all winter long.  With many vehicles this won’t be a problem, but with some manufacturers the computer senses there is a problem and it will put the vehicle in a “limp” mode and not allow it to go over 50km/hr!

The tire pressure sensor is meant to keep you from potentially getting a flat tire and is a good thing to have since most people don’t check their tire pressures regularly.

What do shocks and struts do?
Shock and struts are part of a vehicles suspension and they are meant to absorb the bumps.  Have you ever seen a car that is bouncing down the road when it goes over bumps?  Well, that vehicles shock/struts are likely worn out!  You won’t notice when your struts or shocks are wearing out since you drive your car every day and get used to how it handles.  You may have four struts or two struts and two shocks with springs or 4 shocks and springs.  This really depends on what the manufacturers have decided to put in.

Shocks/struts should be changed at 80,000 kms and they should be done in pairs.  Besides absorbing the bumps and giving you a nice ride, it’s other job is to keep the tire in contact with the road.  A manufacturer of struts did some testing and put new one on one vehicle and struts with 80,000 kms on another identical vehicle.  What they found was the vehicle with worn out struts took up to 10 feet longer to stop in an emergency situation.

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